Being There

“After breakfast, we all get dressed, I pack my daughter’s lunch, and the three of us suit up for the trek to the bus stop. March 2 marks one year since CaRMS Match Day, and rather than being on call or spending time in clinic, I’m on paternity leave.”

A reflection on the year since Match Day, priorities, and the decision to take pat leave.  LINK

Part of the in-House s/p The Match series of reflections looking back on the year since Match Day.

*** Reposted as ‘This physician delayed residency to take paternity leave’ on KevinMD

Contentment

“Come Match Day there will be many cheers and tears of joy, there will also be private anger and disappointment. This is a stressful time in the lives of medical trainees. Should so much joy and sorrow hang on the pursuit of a specialty?”

A reflection on specialty choice, our privilege to study medicine, and fulfillment. On The Muse Magazine’s blog:  LINK

So Long…

Stepping off the ride for a while.

Balancing my family life and medical training have been challenging the last few years, especially during clinical rotations.  We welcomed our third child as I started residency and this fall I began looking into taking parental leave. The more I thought about it the more it made sense.  When I first brought it up those in medicine I expected resistance, instead I found strong support from my program, preceptor, and mentors. Everything is set up, all the paperwork submitted, as of today I’m taking 6 months of leave to enjoy with my family.

Thanks everyone that reads the blog and follows on Twitter.

CaRMS

With CaRMS closing soon for CMGs I wanted to wish everyone luck.  A few friends from the year below me have asked for some help editing and this reminded me of all the stresses of the application process.  A few small things:

  • Make sure to attach all the documents each school wants.  Some want up to 3 reference letters, some accept more.  Little details matter, spend the time to upload everything required
  • Address the prompts for the personal statement
  • Some schools have different CV requirements, be aware
  • Attach a nice picture to your application.  I took mine infront of a wooden door in a hotel during an elective
  • Make sure the picture is of you, not a meme
  • Have a friend or two read over your letters
  • Interested, but boring was the advice I was given.  Don’t try to scare your reader

Soon it will be submitted, the interview invites will hopefully roll in and the next stage will begin.

Best of luck

On Family Medicine

The #justaFP project from the U of Manitoba Family Medicine Interest Group profiles family practitioners. It is an effort to combat negatives attitudes towards the specialty and choosing to be “just” a family doctor.  I was recently profiled and spoke of my journey through medical school along with my choosing Family Medicine and reactions to that choice.  Check it and other profiles out: “just” a family physician

Match

My match moment: Change a soiled diaper, look at the clock and realize it is 12:10, check my results, put on music, and dance with my son.

I’m leaving Western and joining McMaster’s Family Medicine program.  A lot of thought went into choosing this path and my ranking of sites, it should be a great fit.  Now to find a place to live and move for July.

Congrats to 2016s across the country.

“You Should Go Into Medicine”

As an undergraduate student I interned in a microbiology lab and this advice was given to many co-op students by the head of the lab, a kindly middle-aged researcher.  They were so proud sharing what they had been told, that they should be doctors.  A number took the advice and are now in residency or practicing.

Later, working in the same department I decided to ask about the advice he had given numerous times.  “Because they aren’t smart enough to do research,” was his reply.  He went on to explain the job stability and opportunities of a medical career, but I was struck by the contrast between his motivation and the reactions of the students. In this case what is usually considered a compliment was in fact an insult.